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ADHD in 140 Characters or Less

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ADHD impacts everyone in different ways. Sometimes it can be difficult to describe how your life is affected. As part of ADHD Awareness Month, we asked some of our own ADHD Online staff, as well as social media influencer Dani Donovan, to describe their experience with ADHD in 140 characters or less. Here’s what they had to say: 

Crystal: ADHD to me is like running a marathon but you never know where the marathon starts or if you will ever find the finish line.

Jen: ADHD is procrastinating on a task because it seems daunting or uninteresting, then being mad at myself for not completing it.

Lauren: It’s disruptive! It makes life more difficult than I’d like, but it’s a big part of my personality. I’ve learned how to make it work for me!

Dani: ADHD is seeing infinite possibilities of things to do, and then getting overwhelmed and not actually starting on any of them. 

Andrea: For me it’s being easily distracted! At the same time, it is frustrating getting distracted easily, it has also helped me with multitasking.

As you can tell, having ADHD is complex, full of emotions, and unique to each person. By giving words to our experience, we help define ADHD for ourselves and others. If you struggle to describe what ADHD is for you, try this exercise to explain your experience in 140 characters or less. If you’re the parent of a child with ADHD, spend some time asking them what it’s like and help them find the words they need to be better understood. 

As always, our ADHD experts are here to listen, help, and provide resources. 

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